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Our Impact

Our Impact

The Research Shows:
Infants of highly involved fathers are more cognitively competent at 6 months and score higher on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development.

School-aged children of involved fathers are also better academic achievers. They are more likely to get A’s, have better quantitative and verbal skills.

Children of involved fathers are more likely to enjoy school, have better attitudes toward school, participate in extracurricular activities, and graduate. They are also less likely to fail a grade, have poor attendance, or have behavior problems at school.

Children of involved fathers are more likely to become educationally mobile young adults with higher levels of economic and educational achievement, career success, occupational competency, and psychological well being.

Father involvement directly impacts the emotional well-being of children:
Father involvement is positively correlated with children experiencing overall life satisfaction.

Children of involved fathers are more likely to demonstrate a greater tolerance for stress and frustration are more likely to grow up to be tolerant and understanding.

Young adults who had nurturing and available fathers while growing up are more likely to score high on measures of self acceptance and personal and social adjustment.

Father involvement is positively correlated with children’s overall social competence, maturity, and capacity for relatedness with others.

Children of involved fathers are more likely to have positive peer relations and be popular and well liked. Their peer relations are typified by less negativity, less aggression, less conflict, more reciprocity, more generosity, and more positive friendship qualities.

This significantly impacts the society these children create when they mature:
Father involvement protects children from engaging in delinquent behavior, and is associated with less substance abuse among adolescents, less delinquency, less drug use, truancy, and stealing, less drinking, and a lower frequency of externalizing and internalizing symptoms such as acting out, disruptive behavior, depression, sadness and lying.

Adolescents who strongly identified with their fathers were 80% less likely to have been in jail and 75% less likely to have become unwed parents.

At SCFI we are working to create hope and the opportunity for a better Community.
But we can only do it with your help. Join with us in our mission and Help Today!

Children of involved fathers are more likely to enjoy school, have better attitudes toward school, participate in extracurricular activities, and graduate. They are also less likely to fail a grade, have poor attendance, or have behavior problems at school.